One of the highlights of Northern Brazil was a trip to Morro Branco and Das Falésias (cliffs) Beberibe (the name of the area).

As we walked toward the cliffs we were told that that houses along the bluff used to be owned by the fishermen of the town; it’s an ideal location for them. However, this particular stretch is now prime beach view real estate and many of the fisherman have been muscled out.

Upon arrival at the cliffs the sun was hot and intense, so unbearably so that I was worried my +1000 sunscreen wouldn’t work. I’m surprised that any life can survive the intensity, but it can. There were plenty of scrubby trees, cacti, and sharp beach grass that cuts upon contact.

The intensity of the sun got better as we descended into the cliffs. Here the sand acted as a coolant, and there was also some shade in spots.

At a first quick pass the cliffs look red. However, if you look closer you will see that there are a number of different coloured sands contained in the mix.

It’s these different colours that are used by local artists to make the layered sand art you find in Brazil. Most of the sand used in this art comes Beberibe and it’s forbidden for anyone other than the local artisans to take sand from the cliffs.

I’m not sure where the blue sand in some of the bottles comes from. It’s most likely modified.

At places here are natural springs that crop up to the surface, some hot, others cold.